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20121224
20130101
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assumed. guest: we are in non-partisan grass-roots organization devoted to educating the public about fiscal issues. guest: if we go over the cliff, it is not the end of the discussion. it is important people and not lose hope -- that people not lose hope for justice in what happens by midnight is the end of the discussion. the discussions will go on. i am relatively sure if we do not have a deal by december 31, there will be one in january. the damage to the economy would be too great. the public outcry will be significant i will be looking at the dow and s&p. those will get daily responses. host: we can talk more about the deals down the road. let's go to louann on the republican line. caller: to me, the fiscal cliff is a small smokescreen. the fiscal cliff that is coming is obamacare. nobody is addressing obamacare. i have to find out friday will be taxed 2.3% on any device used on us in any of the medical fields. my husband's doctor wrote out a prescription for a blood drop for january. he said i do not know how much this will cost you out of pocket because of obamacare. my husban
world employing tens of thousands of less educated workers. a wonderful recipe for short-run productivity, a wonderful recipe for paying worker $5 a day. it was factories like this that made detroit quite possibly the most productive place on the planet in the '50s, but these were not a recipe for long-run urban regeneration because they don't need the city, they don't give to the city. they're a world unto themselves. when conditions change, and they always change, you just move the factories to places where it's cheaper. you have nothing left. and so as transportation costs declined, we moved these factories to lower cost locale, we moved them to the suburbs, we moved them to the right-to-work states and across the country. now, detroit still has not recovered from deindustrialization. in part, detroit had the worst of all possible worlds, it had a single large industry, a few dominant firms. those firms crowded out all local entrepreneurship, and the city has had a significant degree of problems ever since. they have 25% -- they've lost 25% of their population between
will go with them on educational program. i've been on one before and they do wonderful work and i'm delighted they asked me to be a part of it. >> are you staying here in washington? >> no, of course not. i'm going home to california. you can do everything, you know, remotely now. there is no reason to put yourself in one place that you don't -- that you are leaving anyway. i will back b back in california. >> what are you going miss most about congress? >> it took me a while to realize that i would miss anything. i'm a person when the timing is right, i know i'm doing the right thing, but i'm going to miss my friendships. i'm going miss the excitement. this is an exciting place. i'm used to a lot of activity in my life. if i'm smart at all, i'm going to learn how to sit down, take things in, and not always be on the move. >> who are some of your best friends here in congress? >> without blinking my best friend is barbara lee and maxine waters. others like betty mccollum, when we go to dinner everyone gets nervous that something is up and they are usually right. sometimes we go fo
charter schools that aim to be the model-ts of education. >> america has lots of terrific schools. people open great schools every year, but they typically open just one. nobody has figured out how to mass produce high quality, cost effective schools. >> brown: we remember general norman schwarzkopf-- the man who commanded american-led forces in the persian gulf war known as "desert storm." >> warner: plus, mark shields and david brooks analyze the week's news. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from carnegie corporation of new york, a foundation created to do what andrew carnegie called "real and permanent good." celebrating 100 years of philanthropy at carnegie.org. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: the final weekend has now arrived before the fiscal cliff hits on new year's day and wit
education and remembering general norman schwarzkopf. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: the u.s. economy has dodged a potentially crippling strike at ports up and down the east coast and gulf coast at least, for now. the longshoremen's union agreed today to extend its existing contract by another month. that word came after the union and shipping lines worked out a deal on royalty payments for unloading containers. the contract extension gives the two sides time to resolve their remaining issues. wall street finished the week with its fifth straight losing session. stocks have been falling as concern mounts that washington will fail to get a budget deal. the dow jones industrial average lost 158 points today, to close at 12,938. the nasdaq fell 25 points to close at 2,960. for the week, both the dow and the nasdaq fell 2%. sectarian tensions flared across iraq today as tens of thousands of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. toda
, we need stem education, and, absolutely, i think we do, but we shouldn't underestimate this sense of practical skill that are often passed down from generation, the people of fire who actually are doing things on the factory floor that account for a lot of globe's most successful innovation when it comes to fire suits. one of the pieces, as i said, is that our democratic culture in the business world gives us this competitive advantage of o more authoritarian manufacturing structure, particularly small and medium sized businesses because that allows them to economize production, and that allows them to customize products. the second thesis in the book is tracing a support of manufacturing back in american history, and the idea there's always been a role for government support of private industry. going all the way back to alexander hamilton. i tell people you don't have to read the "world the flat" to understand what we have to do in a global competitive world. read alexander ham hamilton's rt on manufacturing, ten pages, and me makes the argument. he says in a world where we are
better education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. >> this is wonderful. our problems are solved w know what works and we will be rich. >>guest: no, we have this problem with two billion human beings in poverty. i did most of my research in the poor part of the world. all poor people are clever otherwise they would be died. if you are poor and stupid, you die. >> they don't have rule of law? >>guest: they don't have rule of law or access to credit and they are locked in a vicious circle poverty. it takes a small investment to get them out of that. to me it shows the aptitude of people. when a young couple decide to grab if the kingdom and to have two children, they invest in the children and they take off. we have two-child families from here and onward. the world is governed from that. it is not the big corporations or banks that run the economy, it is the young couple who decide to work. >> when they are educated with wealth they . >> are helpful. this fantastic investment in vaccinations that helps so do you n
economic growth. their ideas of 20 years ago they have a better education event to antonia from 1970 to. so we can see the african john: this is wonderful. now we will all be rich. >> now at his $2 million not because they are stupid. allport people are clever or they would be dead. john: they have no love lost. >> no. or excessive credit but locked into a vicious circle of poverty. it takes a small investment to get them now.g with the young couple decides to grab the condom or the pill with two kids that means we build a decent house then they take off. the world is governed fromank the bedroom. not that the banks monday economy but the young couple, john: once they are educated they can have smaller families. >> with the fantastic investment of immunizations so they don't have one kid that is physically handicapped. the way government resources are used something slight advance research we need the government money l. john: next to a muddy you want to live until 150 the next person may have already been born. howl evades is in medicine may change everything. this is flo. i need you. i fe
education than, -- and tanzania is similar to thailand in 1972 and soon we will see african countries doing good. this is wonderful. our problems are solved w know what works and we will be rich. >>guest: no, we have this problem with two billion human beings in poverty. i did most of my research in the poor part of the world. all poor people are clever otherwise they would be died. if you are poor and stupid, you die. >> they don't have rule of law? >>guest: they don't have rule of law or access to credit and they are locked in a vicious circle poverty. it takes a small investment to get them out of that. to me it shows the aptitude of people. when a young couple decide t grab if the kingdom and to have two children, they invest in the children and they take off. we have two-child families from here and onward. the world is governed from that. it is not the big corporations or banks that run the economy, it is the young couple who decide to work. >> when they are educated with wealth they . >> are helpful. this fantastic investment in vaccinations that helps so do you not have a kid who is
and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military education programs and other venues and the maturing of thinking and policies since 9/11 and katrina. there is a recognition within this analysis that there are gaps in awareness of the capabilities dod can provide in complex catastrophes, as well as the inherent complexities and lack of understanding in our various chains of command and our authorities. the report recognizes what we have used to drive the dsca portion of fleet week, that local authorities are likely to be overwhelmed in a complex catastrophe and that the president will direct support to civil authorities. that san francisco fleet week assumption is now stated as a guiding principle inside the dod for planning and activities. the objective of the dod effort is to enable the effective access to and use of defense capabilities in the event of a disaster. critical to this is a review of authoriti
evadetors. missing money that could have a tax impact on education. >> when question come back, it seems to be a mystery of the universe. we'll show you your own personal best option. >> with most cell phone contracts lasting 2 year, many consumers want to make sure they get the carrier that deliver the best quality for the lowest price. no one service fits all. >> reporter: who has the best mobile phone service? >> verizon. >> at&t. >> metro pcs. >> we never tell anybody. >> reporter: bill moore can help. uses only store bought unmodified thongs indoors and outside and while driving. >> we put software on it that helps automate test. the test we run are calls and up load and download data test. >> reporter: employees travel around the nation recording the data and transferring it to free maps you can access. that general information is not specific to how you use your phone. >> for some people, all they want that phone for is for calling. other people all they care about is data services. if i'm a teenage, i probably only care about texting. >> reporter: there's a free metrics app f
to work. when they are educated with wealth they . >> are helpful. this fantastic invtment in vaccinations that helps so do you not have a d who is physically handicapped for life, thatrags the family down. the way that government sources are used is crucial. there are some things like advancement and research and primary school we need the government money but it has to be controlled. >> thank you, sir. next, you want to live to be 150? my next guest says the frst rson to do so my have already been born. itmight be you. do you want to live to be 150? i don't. how advances in medicine may change everything. the boys useasasasasas capital one venture miles for their annual football trip. that's double miles you can actually use. tragically, their ddy got sacked by blackouts. but it's our tradition! that's roughing the card holder. buwith the capital one venture card you get double miles you can actually use. [ cheering ] any flight, anytime. the scoreboard doesn't lie. what's in your wallet? hut! i have me on my fantasy team. >> most of human history people died by age 30. 30 year s the ave
. and was much better educated and having herself worked as a teacher for many years. there was nothing this woman could not do too late linoleum or explain mathematics. following the birth of their fourth child she would handle the affairs at the milk while skinner was in england and ran the boarding house. and was intimately involved in her husband's business but she was the wife of a rich manufacturer. there is no economic reason for her to absorber these responsibilities. she took them on. but lizzy was a partner for the first wife died young. but she had raised the children as her own and given birth to age more and of the 10 children seveners still living and all were thriving. and with smart educated young women. but studying french with nine other than george to would be the prime minister of france. going one step further and nina went to college was up in poughkeepsie new york. the oldest, will, 17 was about to close out high-school at the prestigious seminary in east hampton and massachusetts. graduation was a few weeks away if he could make it without being expelled. he is c
education. i have read in this book, -- partly they think it is normal. justice kennedy goes over to china lot. -- goes over to china in a lot. what would you say? we wrote down eight or nine. ultimately, what you're working towards is a general understanding. i found my own way of expressing that. of what that understanding has to be. maybe you can get there. when i saw the apartheid in south africa, it meant something to me. i looked at the television and on the television, there is a woman, well dressed, well- educated woman, well spoken. she is black. she says the following. country? our situation is not normal. how did you get people to think that is normal to follow a rule of law and follow the judges even when the judges decide something you think is wrong and even when it is unpopular? the problem is put to me by those students at the university. you have to have an independent judiciary. how do you do that? tell them they cannot be fired. they will love that. and then you tell them we will not cut your pay. which we don't live up to here, by the way. they will like that, too. i he
and well. the things he has done, whether it is health reform or education reform, making higher education more affordable, expanding pell grants, creating the consumer financial protection bureau. they are all aimed at one thing -- to create a economy in which we have a vital middle-class and our tax policy reflects that as well. opportunity is broadly available. i think that is solidly in the mainstream of the democratic party. we can have a debate about means of achieving that, and i think we have to do some soul- searching about how in the 21st century we achieve those goals, and whether all the avenues and pathways that made sense 50 and 60 and 70 years ago are still valid today. many of them may be -- some may not. on the fundamental goals, he is solidly in the position of the democratic party, solidly progressive. i think that is a lot of what the election was about. >> in this election it has been observed that much of the advertising was predominantly negative. i would like to ask -- i know both sides of campaigns engaged in this. including an obama at that scene to insinuate that
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
of the epa. they talk about the cannot of education, the department of agency and epa waste of money. >> cost too much, all about regulations. are you one of the few people employed to this organization who has been to north korea. >> twice. i hope to go back again soon. >>> just ahead, a warning to democrats from republicans, they will not write a blank check to solve the fiscal cliff. reaction from debbie snab now of michigan, next. >>> plus, the best selling river of "gone baby gone" and mystic river" has a new crime to solve. where is his dog? dennis lahane is asking for help finding his dog tessa. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
involved in another political campaign. but it talks about health care, education, the policy of capital punishment, which regardless of your philosophy isn't working. getting into responsible criminal-justice issues and rehabilitation, that sort of thing. i even recommended going on the metric system which is certainly something else and you said i'm running for vice president with governor gary johnson. it's amazing because she from a totally different perspective has come out to pretty much the same analysis that i have on all these important issues like education. today the talk you were wearing, and i like it by the way, deutsch shows how much to spend, where to go, what to buy. like all other consumer goods that is how we get reasonable bids for reasonable prices that education is completely different than that. it is funded from the top up so the federal government thinks of this money keeps a bunch of it and gives it to the state and keep a bunch of it for their administrative costs and give it to the school districts, give it to the schools, the use a lot of administrative costs
mother and father through months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond hill georgia and the surroundisurroundi ng areas welcomes matthew home with tears, flags and staff salute. the streets were lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing it has memorial service at the methodist church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout, a local boy scout troop honored him by collecting pens and papers and sending them to mattheus unit map these unit in afghanistan. a dear friend who was involved in the media had a fission and the project began. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film on memorial day 2010. since then with the help of so many volunteers, and i can't name them all, that project has sent over seven tons of school supplies to our soldiers and marines in humanitarian efforts in afghanistan. matthews small town of richmond hill and outlying city of savannah and their great army bases of ft. stewart and hunter army airfield and the savannah aircard have helped me heal by supporting the
are admitted may face expulsion due to their faith. the fwa high institute for higher education -- the baha'i institute for higher education established after they were barred from attending other universities were declared illegal this year and six educators from that institute are currently imprisoned in iran. these are just a fraction of the injustices, mr. speaker, that the baha'is face at the hands of the iranian regime. the regime has sought to make life for the baha'i people simply unlivable. they seek to take things from everyday life. this resolution draws attention to their plight. it calls on the iranian regime toened its campaign of -- to end its campaign and it condemns them for the persecution of the baha'is and calls on the regime to immediately release the baha'is that it wrongfully holds in captivity, including the seven baha'i leaders and the six baha'i educators and it calls for the president and the secretary to make publicly -- to publicly express the same sentiments. finally, the resolution urges the president and the secretary of state to use measures already enacted
to account in "san francisco chronicle" he feared influx that it might dilute the educational experience for the business students. i'll a valid concern, say experts who suggest the admission board rely as much on rig louse language screening as on test scores. >> it could go smoothly. it takes training on part of the staff. >> elsewhere on campus, where the number of chinese students pursuing american education is on expected to grow. >> more and more students come and want an opportunity here. >> claudia cowen, fox news. >> doug: from ghost town to boom town. california was population 1. just 25 years ago. the town is going high-tech in major way. anita vogel explains. >> he happened on a town. >> distressed and the hotel had been condemned by the county. a structure. none of the buildings work. >> cal it can trained gee jol gist bought the town for $200,000 and spent 25 years and $1 million to restore it. installing solar panels. the town has a mini boom. >> it has blossomed from 60 residents. they stream in the area to see the solar installations. rare earth minding expanded in the h
institutions or any other educator at any level. it is more conducive working hand in hand with communities and that is where i stand in coming here today. >> congressmen elijah cummings said the board's decision was a done deal and said he was looking forward to a more diplomatic process where the public could have a say. >> i think we have a great board. 15 very dedicated people trying to make the right decision. we will hear from dr. wilson and make the best decision in the interest of the university. >> we have some good news tonight for the ports up and down the east coast in the retailers to depend on them. the possible strike that could a crippled the cargo economy will not happen for at least another 30 days. 11 news has been keeping an eye on the negotiations. federal mediators say that the union has agreed to extend their contract until at least midnight january 28th. the work stoppage would have idled shipments of a huge range of consumer products from electronics to clothing. now to the fiscal cliff hanger. three more days and then tax hikes on everyone, automatic spending cuts,
% and making a educational investment and putting 90 million into the nook media, which is kind of part of barnes & noble's business, but then put out the bad news, barnes & noble and their holiday sales will come in below expectations and their nook business would not meet their prior production for the full year, 2013. so they're smart over there. >> it's interesting up 11% on the good news, up only 2% when the bad news comes in. >> minutes later. >> there we are now. thanks very much indeed. we've got it right, the futures pre he dicted a 60, 70% drop. we're down 71, 76 points this friday morning, close to dropping below 13,000 and we have the declining gas prices over, sorry, at least over for now. the price of gas up 2% overnight according to triple-a. it's up 4 cents in a week. new york highest gas price in the continental u.s. 3.72. hawaii always a bit higher than that. wyoming cheapest today 3.01, missouri just a tad above wyoming as of right now. here is the price of oil, we're roughly $91 rah barre a barrel e decline in gas prices has come to an end. oil is back iito the $90 r
with literacy. that is a problem with education. there is an inevitable path of increasing sophistication, the amount of information that people can process and the amount of narrative complexity that people can process. it is on an increasing curve. >> i know you are an optimist. >> i am optimistic. look at television in 1968 versus or television is today. look at what the cbs evening newscast from 1974 versus what is happening today. it has become more politicized. the ability to process information has grown. these are issues of education. >> [inaudible] >> right. it is now more obvious. >> there is ongoing battle globally. people are putting out ideas. various ways, hidden or not, and value systems for these arguments. that is going on all the time. every single person involved on whatever level in our industry is putting something out there. obviously, you have to take responsibility for it. you try to work out exactly -- you join in a battle. someone else is saying probably the opposite. you have to get in there and do it. other people will not stop and you have to do battle with th
as did finding myself in this arena in having this incredible awakening and education. since i left the duke ellington school, i have often gone back to give master classes and work with young singers. my agency would often scheduled concert with master classes. again known in the industry has teaching younger -- i get known in the industry as teaching younger students. we have a number of to the -- we have a number of tickets we give away or offer at a discounted price. i remember when i was a student and saw my first opera. it was because the kennedy center and extended a certain amount of tickets for students to come. i realized there is a tremendous responsibility. it is also a pleasure to want to share this gorgeous art form with people and young people in particular. i know the impact and difference it made in my life have been known at 13 this is what i wanted to do. it gave me a direction and purpose. i never suffered under pressure of my desire to keep up with the latest. when i would go to a voice lesson or concert, there was no synthetic that could provide me with that ki
. >> woodruff: from boston, hari sreenivasan reports on a city- wide effort to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station
to keep kids engaged in education through meaningful work experiences. >> we're starting at the very early ages to try to help young people speak. that is a direct relationship to being successful in school and being successful in your life >> woodruff: and we close out 2012 with two takes on history, first, a look at the emancipation proclamation on the eve of the 150th anniversary of president lincoln's action to end slavery and the civil war. >> woodruff: plus michael beschloss and richard norton smith talk about potential historical turning points of the past year. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: the old year ticked down
? that's ahead. >>> plus, forget about a college education. why the oil fields of america are now attracting the young. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> gold prices closing right now. let's get to bertha coombs. >> gold closing fractionally higher, on track for its twelfth yearly gain, smallest since 2008 because it's been a very tough quarter for gold. despite the fact we've had all these worries, whether it be the fiscal cliff, the election, the situation in europe. nonetheless, gold has just not been the safe haven. this morning, it was industrial metals that got a boost as we saw rallies in asia on hopes that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more
education to change the behavior of a driver by a combination of countermeasures together to change the situation. >> reporter: with so many cars on the road, campaigns to increase safety are bound to land. but gradually safety-conscious people are making inroads. takafumi terui, nhk world, beijing. >>> iran will conduct naval drills for six days in the strait of hormuz in the persian gulf. the exercise is apparently meant to showcase its military strength in the world's vital oil and gas shipping route. iran's naval commander told reporters the drills will begin on friday. they'll involve areas across the strait of hormuz and northern parts of the indian ocean. the commander said the drill will test the navy's missile systems, combat ships and submarines, and iranian-made spy drones. he said the exercises are intended to counter threats from enemy countries. iran carried out similar drills last december and january. officials have said that iran might block the strait. this prompted the u.s. to send a nuclear-powered aircraft carrier to the area. analysts say iran will conduct the
. and by the arthur vining davis foundations. dedicated to strengthening america's future through education. adcasting, dedicated to strengthening america's future and contributions to your pbs station, from viewers like you. in the neighbourhood ♪ and contributions to your pbs station, ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ would you be mine? ♪ could you be mine? ♪ won't you be my neighbour? - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ a la of make-believe ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ it's daniel tiger's neighborhood ♪ ♪ so much to do, so much to see ♪ ♪ won't you ride along with me? ♪ - ♪ ride along - ♪ i've got lots of friends for you to meet ♪ ♪ in this land of make-believe ♪ a friendly face on every street ♪ just waiting to greet you ♪ it's a beautiful day in the neighbourhood ♪ ♪ a beautiful day for a neighbour ♪ ♪ in daniel tiger's neighborhood! ♪ grr! hi, neighbour! grr! i'm daniel tiger, and this is tigey! grr! we're playing jungle! (chattering) want to play? put on your binoculars like this. ooh! there's my jungle
believe we can integrate this local knowledge into future disaster prevention education by listening to the song. >> reporter: through her research, she was further shocked to find leer yaks about the march 11 earthquake have been added to the song. ♪ ♪ >> reporter: memories of the tsunami are gradually fading. >> translator: life is back to normal now. >> translator: a tsunami won't hit us again. >> reporter: at a local school, takafuji introduces the song to the children by showing them videos she took of the island. >> translator: the song says to immediately run to the nearest hilltop. >> translator: i realize that you must always be cautious and that you must immediately run away in order to save your life. >> reporter: although the song was only sung in indigenous communities, it is gradually being passed on to a wider audience as a song that can actually save lives. nhk world, indonesia. >>> thousands of people waiting to go home. tons of debris waiting for disposal. vast tracts of land waiting to be restored. overcoming the challenges of the past 2011 disaster won't be ea
is trying to provide the children at the camp with education, teaching them how to read, write, and drop. the children's drawings illustrate the impact of the war on their lives and the months many have spent in the camp. >> this is the helicopter of b ashar al assad. until a few months ago, about 5000 people live here. now there are four times that number. the refugees are glad to have a roof over their heads. osama hassan from aleppo spent months in a tent. >> i just wanted to get over the border. a turkish border soldiers shot me in the leg without warning. they are not letting anyone through any more. >> it is hard for the syrian air force because of its proximity to the border. that is why the three syrian army set up their command center here. they have been planning their offensives in damascus and aleppo from a former school building. however, their tasks are changing as they take areas from government troops, and they have to look after the people. >> almost every third soldier among our troops has been pulled back from the front and put toward doing civilian tasks. >> such prob
believe we can integrate this local knowledge into future disaster prevention education. >> reporter: during her research, takafuji was further shocked to find in some communities, items about the earthquake have been added to the song. ♪ >> reporter: in aceh's capital, banda aceh, however, memories of the tsunami are gradually fading. >> translator: life is back to normal now. >> translator: a tsunami won't hit us again. >> reporter: at a local school, takafuji introduces the song to the children by showing them videos she took on the island. >> translator: the song says to immediately run to the nearest hilltop. >> translator: i realize that you must always be cautious and that you must immediately run away in order to save your life. >> reporter: although the song was sang in the indigenous community, it's gradually being passed on to a wider audience as a song that can actually save lives. shinga soto, nhk world, aceh province, indonesia. >>> i'm patchari raksawong in bangkok. >>> thousands of people gathered in tokyo to say farewell to a master of traditional japanese theater.
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